85 Shocking Domestic Violence Statistics (Inc. References)

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  1. Prevalence Among Women and Men: More than 1 in 3 women (approximately 33.3%) and 1 in 4 men (25%) in the U.S. experience rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, n.d.)
  2. Daily Calls to Hotlines: Domestic violence hotlines across the nation receive over 20,000 calls on a typical day. (National Domestic Violence Hotline, n.d.)
  3. Severe Physical Violence: Nearly 1 in 4 women (24.3%) and 1 in 7 men (13.8%) have experienced severe physical violence by an intimate partner. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, n.d.)
  4. Intimate Partner Violence and Violent Crime: Intimate partner violence accounts for 15% of all violent crime. (National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, n.d.)
  5. Children’s Exposure: 1 in 15 children are exposed to intimate partner violence each year, with 90% of these children being eyewitnesses to this violence. (National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, n.d.)
  6. Economic Impact: The cost of intimate partner violence exceeds $8.3 billion per year, including costs for medical care, mental health services, and lost productivity. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, n.d.)
  7. Reporting and Help-Seeking: Despite the high prevalence, domestic violence is often underreported due to factors such as fear, stigma, and lack of support. (National Domestic Violence Hotline, n.d.)
  8. Impact on Mental Health: Victims of intimate partner violence are at a higher risk for developing mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). (Smith et al., 2017)
  9. Impact on Physical Health: Victims of domestic violence are more likely to suffer from a range of health issues including chronic pain, gastrointestinal disorders, sexually transmitted diseases, and gynecological problems. (Campbell, 2002)
  10. Impact on Children’s Health: Children who witness domestic violence are at a higher risk of having health problems, including frequent illness, gastrointestinal problems, headaches, and higher rates of asthma. (Wolfe et al., 2003)
  11. Female Victims and Homicide: Nearly half of female victims of intimate partner violence are killed by their current or former male partners. (Petrosky et al., 2017)
  12. Stalking and Intimate Partner Violence: An estimated 15.2% of women and 5.7% of men have been a victim of stalking during their lifetimes, which often co-occurs with intimate partner violence. (Breiding et al., 2014)
  13. Economic Abuse: Economic abuse occurs in 98% of abusive relationships, where abusers restrict access to financial resources, thereby controlling their partners. (Adams et al., 2008)
  14. Domestic Violence and Pregnancy: Approximately 324,000 pregnant women in the U.S. experience intimate partner violence each year. (Chambliss, 2008)
  15. Lifetime Economic Impact: The lifetime economic cost associated with medical services for intimate partner violence-related injuries, lost productivity, and criminal justice costs is estimated at $3.6 trillion. (Peterson et al., 2018)
  16. Impact on Work and Productivity: Victims of domestic violence lose a total of 8 million days of paid work each year, which is the equivalent of over 32,000 full-time jobs. (National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 2003)
  17. Teen Dating Violence: Among high school students who dated, 21% of females and 10% of males experienced physical and/or sexual dating violence. (Kann et al., 2018)
  18. Impact on Housing Instability: Approximately 38% of all victims of domestic violence become homeless at some point in their lives. (National Network to End Domestic Violence, 2017)
  19. Firearm-Related Domestic Violence: The presence of a gun in domestic violence situations increases the risk of homicide for women by 500%. (Campbell et al., 2003)
  20. Healthcare Costs: The average healthcare costs for domestic violence survivors are 42% higher than for non-victims. (Bonomi et al., 2009)
  21. Domestic Violence and Substance Abuse: Women who experience intimate partner violence are 70% more likely to drink heavily than those who do not experience such violence. (Gilbert et al., 2010)
  22. Impact on Children’s Academic Performance: Children exposed to domestic violence are more likely to experience difficulties in school, including lower grades and higher rates of suspension and expulsion. (Wolfe et al., 2003)
  23. Repeat Victimization: Approximately 76% of women who reported experiencing rape or physical violence by an intimate partner also reported being victimized by the same partner multiple times. (Black et al., 2011)
  24. Domestic Violence and Homelessness: Domestic violence is one of the primary causes of homelessness for women and their children. (National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty, 2016)
  25. Impact on Mental Health Services: Victims of intimate partner violence are more likely to use mental health services than non-victims. (Goldstein et al., 2009)
  26. Domestic Violence and Chronic Health Conditions: Women who experience intimate partner violence are 80% more likely to suffer from a stroke and 70% more likely to have heart disease. (Campbell et al., 2002)
  27. Impact on Reproductive Health: Women who experience physical or sexual abuse have higher rates of sexually transmitted infections, unintended pregnancies, and abortions. (Pallitto et al., 2013)
  28. Psychological Impact on Victims: Victims of intimate partner violence are twice as likely to experience depression and almost twice as likely to have suicidal thoughts. (Devries et al., 2013)
  29. Economic Abuse and Employment: Up to 60% of domestic violence victims lose their jobs due to reasons stemming from the abuse. (Lloyd, 2012)
  30. Impact on Emergency Services: Domestic violence accounts for 15% of all violent crime, leading to increased use of emergency services. (Truman & Morgan, 2014)
  31. Impact on Substance Use: Victims of domestic violence are more likely to abuse alcohol and drugs; women who experience intimate partner violence are 15 times more likely to abuse alcohol and 9 times more likely to abuse drugs than those who do not. (Warshaw et al., 2009)
  32. Domestic Violence and Pregnancy Outcomes: Pregnant women who experience intimate partner violence are more likely to have preterm birth and low birth weight babies. (Shah & Shah, 2010)
  33. Impact on Long-Term Health: Women who have experienced intimate partner violence are more likely to suffer from arthritis, chronic pain, irritable bowel syndrome, and diabetes. (Coker et al., 2002)
  34. Domestic Violence and Housing Instability: Over 80% of mothers with children experiencing homelessness have previously experienced domestic violence. (Bassuk et al., 1996)
  35. Impact on Children’s Mental Health: Children who witness domestic violence are at a higher risk for emotional and behavioral problems, including anxiety, depression, poor school performance, and aggression. (Kitzmann et al., 2003)
  36. Domestic Violence and Emergency Room Visits: Approximately 5% of emergency room visits by women are the result of intimate partner violence. (Rand, 1997)
  37. Impact on Children’s Physical Health: Children exposed to domestic violence are more likely to experience a range of illnesses, including asthma, gastrointestinal disorders, and frequent headaches. (Bair-Merritt et al., 2006)
  38. Domestic Violence and Suicide Attempts: Women who experience domestic violence are more likely to attempt suicide. (Devries et al., 2011)
  39. Elder Abuse: Approximately 10% of older adults report experiencing abuse, including domestic violence, in the past month. (Acierno et al., 2010)
  40. Teen Dating Violence and Sexual Health: Teens who experience dating violence are more likely to engage in risky sexual behaviors, contract sexually transmitted infections, and experience unintended pregnancies. (Silverman et al., 2001)
  41. Impact on Work Performance: Victims of domestic violence are more likely to experience job loss, have difficulties in maintaining steady employment, and have lower personal incomes. (Swanberg & Logan, 2005)
  42. Domestic Violence and Chronic Illness: Women who have experienced domestic violence are more likely to report having a chronic health condition. (Bonomi et al., 2009)
  43. Impact on Mental Health of Children: Children who witness domestic violence are at increased risk for developing psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder. (Wolfe et al., 2003)
  44. Firearm-Related Domestic Violence: The presence of a firearm in a household with domestic violence can increase the risk of homicide by up to 500%. (Campbell et al., 2003)
  45. Domestic Violence and Homelessness: Domestic violence is a leading cause of homelessness among women and families. (National Alliance to End Homelessness, 2016)
  46. Domestic Violence and Physical Injury: About 35% of women who visit emergency rooms for injuries are there because of domestic violence. (Wisner et al., 1999)
  47. Impact on Women’s Health: Women who have experienced domestic violence are more likely to suffer from fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. (Woods, 2000)
  48. Domestic Violence and Reproductive Coercion: Approximately 25% of women who experience domestic violence also face reproductive coercion. (Miller et al., 2010)
  49. Impact on Children’s Behavior: Children exposed to domestic violence are more likely to exhibit aggressive, anxious, depressed, or hyperactive behavior. (Kitzmann et al., 2003)
  50. Domestic Violence and Economic Hardship: Women who experience domestic violence are more likely to face economic hardships, including difficulty finding housing, job instability, and lack of access to bank accounts or credit. (Adams et al., 2008)
  51. Impact on Future Violence: Children who witness domestic violence are more likely to be involved in an abusive relationship as adults. (Ehrensaft et al., 2003)
  52. Domestic Violence and Pregnancy: Pregnant women who experience domestic violence are more likely to delay prenatal care and have a higher risk of miscarriage. (Chambliss, 2008)
  53. Impact on Mental Health Services for Children: Children exposed to domestic violence are more likely to require mental health services. (Graham-Bermann & Seng, 2005)
  54. Domestic Violence and Homelessness Among Youth: Up to 50% of homeless youth report that domestic violence played a major role in their homelessness. (Covenant House, 2017)
  55. Impact on Substance Use Among Youth: Adolescents exposed to domestic violence are more likely to abuse drugs and alcohol. (Wolfe et al., 2003)
  56. Domestic Violence and Disability: Women with disabilities are 40% more likely to experience intimate partner violence than women without disabilities. (Brownridge, 2006)
  57. Impact on Women’s Employment: Up to 60% of victims of intimate partner violence lose their jobs due to reasons related to the abuse. (Lloyd, 2012)
  58. Domestic Violence and Health Care Utilization: Women who experience domestic violence are more likely to utilize health care services, including emergency room visits and hospitalizations. (Rivara et al., 2007)
  59. Impact on Children’s Health Care Utilization: Children who witness domestic violence are more likely to have higher health care utilization, including emergency room visits. (Rivara et al., 2007)
  60. Teen Dating Violence and Mental Health: Teens who experience dating violence are more likely to suffer from depression and anxiety. (Exner-Cortens et al., 2013)
  61. Domestic Violence and Chronic Pain: Women who experience intimate partner violence are more likely to report chronic pain conditions such as headaches, back pain, and abdominal pain. (Coker et al., 2000)
  62. Impact on Women’s Long-Term Health: Women who have experienced domestic violence have a higher risk of developing long-term health problems, including heart disease and stroke. (Campbell et al., 2002)
  63. Domestic Violence and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): Victims of domestic violence are at a higher risk of developing PTSD. (Golding, 1999)
  64. Impact on Children’s Educational Outcomes: Children exposed to domestic violence are more likely to experience difficulties in school, including lower academic performance and behavioral issues. (Holt et al., 2008)
  65. Domestic Violence and Substance Abuse Among Victims: Victims of domestic violence are more likely to abuse alcohol and drugs as coping mechanisms. (Kilpatrick et al., 1997)
  66. Domestic Violence and Health Care Costs: Victims of intimate partner violence have 42% higher health care costs compared to non-victims. (Bonomi et al., 2009)
  67. Impact on Children’s Development: Exposure to domestic violence in childhood is linked to developmental delays in children. (Wolfe et al., 2003)
  68. Domestic Violence and Pregnancy Complications: Women who experience domestic violence during pregnancy are at a higher risk for complications such as low birth weight and preterm labor. (Taillieu & Brownridge, 2010)
  69. Impact on Adolescent Health: Adolescents exposed to domestic violence are at an increased risk for substance abuse, eating disorders, and risky sexual behavior. (Ackard & Neumark-Sztainer, 2002)
  70. Domestic Violence and Homelessness in Women: Up to 50% of homeless women report that domestic violence was the immediate cause of their homelessness. (Jasinski et al., 2002)
  71. Impact on Employment Stability: Victims of domestic violence are more likely to experience disruptions in their employment, such as absenteeism and job loss. (Swanberg et al., 2005)
  72. Domestic Violence and Mental Health in Men: Men who experience domestic violence are at an increased risk for mental health issues, including depression and anxiety. (Hines & Douglas, 2011)
  73. Impact on Health in Later Life: Experiencing domestic violence is linked to poorer health in later life, including increased risk for chronic conditions. (Bonomi et al., 2007)
  74. Domestic Violence and Risk of Homicide: Women who experience domestic violence are at a higher risk of being killed by their intimate partner. (Campbell et al., 2003)
  75. Impact on Children’s Mental Health Services: Children exposed to domestic violence are more likely to need mental health services. (Graham-Bermann & Levendosky, 1998)
  76. Domestic Violence and Emergency Shelter: Approximately 63% of homeless women have experienced domestic violence in their adult lives. (National Network to End Domestic Violence, 2017)
  77. Impact on Women’s Health Services Utilization: Women with a history of intimate partner violence are more likely to utilize women’s health services. (Coker et al., 2002)
  78. Domestic Violence and Child Custody: Around 30-60% of perpetrators of intimate partner violence also abuse children in the household. (Edleson, 1999)
  79. Impact on Adolescent Substance Abuse: Adolescents who witness domestic violence are more likely to abuse alcohol and drugs. (Wolfe et al., 2003)
  80. Domestic Violence and Pregnancy-Related Deaths: Domestic violence is a leading cause of pregnancy-related deaths in the United States. (Chang et al., 2005)
  81. Impact on Women’s Employment: Women who are victims of domestic violence lose a total of 8 million days of paid work each year. (National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 2003)
  82. Domestic Violence and Mental Health in Children: Children exposed to domestic violence are at an increased risk for PTSD, depression, and anxiety. (Kilpatrick et al., 2003)
  83. Impact on Long-Term Health in Women: Women who have experienced domestic violence have a higher risk of developing asthma, diabetes, and irritable bowel syndrome. (Coker et al., 2002)
  84. Domestic Violence and Health Care Costs in Children: Children exposed to domestic violence have higher overall health care costs. (Rivara et al., 2007)
  85. Impact on Women’s Longevity: Women who experience domestic violence have a higher mortality rate compared to women who do not experience such violence. (Campbell et al., 2002)

References

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1 thought on “85 Shocking Domestic Violence Statistics (Inc. References)”

  1. Recently also peace research has focused on the consequences of domestic violence for a whole country: Austrian sociologist Franz Jedlicka has included it in his “Culture of Violence Scale 2023”. An interesting approach!

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